Thanksblogging

Doesn’t quite roll off the tongue, does it? Thanksblogging. I suppose we could call it Blogsgiving, except that I’m thanking blogs rather than giving them, or even Thanksblogsgiving, but that’s rather a mouthful.

Then again, isn’t Thanksgiving all about mouthfuls? Big, delicious mouthfuls of glazed turkey, hot stuffing, cranberry sauce, salads, mashed potatoes with gravy, and pumpkin pie, and all the other sides and toppings your family likes to add on. Exactly what Abraham Lincoln intended for the holiday when he made it official, right?

Okay, perhaps that’s not actually what it’s about. Thanksgiving is about giving thanks to God for all the blessings He has given us.

And since this is a blog, I’m going to single out one post (or a series, if they are inextricably linked) from each of the blogs I read often that I am particularly thankful for. Note, of course, that each blog has many more posts of great worth and interest.

Blog Posts I am Thankful For

From Darren at them0vieblog, his series on James Bond. His in-depth analyses of every movie and Bond-actor has greatly increased my enjoyment of the Bond franchise, and has influenced me to accept the theory that the legendary name is an alias passed down to each new generation with the 007 status.

From the great wealth of good advice that Stephanie gives at BeKindRewrite, I find her discussions of an author’s narrative voice in a given story to be more helpful than much else I’ve read on the topic.

From Jamie Helton at FilmVerse, his defense of 3D as a filmmaking tool is both optimistic and practical.

From M.Q. Allen, this informative post on the Middle Ages and what aspiring fantasy writers should know about it.

From jrlookingbill at Try-ing—to-be—mis-under-stood, the posts on George MacDonald’s Lilithare especially good, although there are many that summarize and discuss the works of some of the great philosophers.

From the Episcopal priest at Dover Beach, I appreciate the insightful quotes he posts from insightful Christians throughout the ages, from Thomas á Kempis, to Professor Tolkien.

From aquisha at the Ridiculously Awesome Movie Adventure Blog, his review of Steven Spielberg’s 1991 movie Hook.

From El Santo of The Webcomic Overlook, especially his review of Delilah Dirk and the Turkish Lieutenant, which introduced me to one of the prettiest and most entertaining webcomics I’ve found yet.

From my friend Jubilare, I’m thankful for so many of her posts, but the beginning of her upcoming series on the Free Peoples of Middle Earth is very good and thought-provoking.

From the sadly retired collaboration at the Picture Book Report, the illustrations for The Neverending Storyare particularly haunting and beautiful.

From authoress Nicola Slade at Nicola Slade’s Winchester Mysteries, I found her recollection of The Eagle of the Ninthto be charming.

From Grimmella, I’m thankful for her thoughtful participation in The Hobbit Read-Along.

From Brenton Dickieson at A Pilgrim in Narnia, I’m grateful for many of his thoughts, such as his rundown of a collection of important and lesser-known essays by C.S. Lewis.

From Rob, The Old Book Junkie, there are some neat posts on G.K. Chesterton’s Orthodoxy. I particularly like his concise run-through of Chapter 4: The Ethics of Elfland.

Michael of Like Something More Than Mortal has a series examining superheroes that is well worth the time of anyone so interested.

From Novareylin at MySeryniti, her lists of Terry Pratchett’s Discworld books in order of recommended reading and dates published will provide a useful guide once I finally dig into that series.

From Taliesin Tale-Weaver of Lights in the Library, I really appreciate his contribution to The Hobbit Read-Along on Chapter 4: “Over Hill and Under Hill.”

From Steve Betz of Stevil, this drabble, a hundred-word story, which challenges the way we look at those beggars on the street.

From David Mitchell at Morning at the Brown Brink, his contribution to Pages Unbound’s Tolkien Week celebration on The Children of Húrin is a great summary of a series of posts he did for While We’re Paused.

From Pages Unbound, I appreciate the comments on Tolkien’s “Smith of Wooton Major,” a story which shockingly I still haven’t yet read.

From Mere Inkling, Rob’s neat reflection on the power of Boromir’s death in Fellowship of the Ring.

From Theologians, Inc., his comparison of Greek and Northern mythologies.

From Invisible Kingdoms, Karl Beech’s exploration of the literary and poetic uses of the legend of Lyonesse, that ancient kingdom on a lost English peninsula that supposedly sank beneath the sea.

From Jenny’s Sketchbook, her gorgeous drawing of my favorite couple from Tolkien’s legendarium, Beren and Luthien.

From The King of Elfland’s Second Cousin, Chris’s recent ruminations on Structure and Perspective in Children’s Stories and Films.

From Steven E. Golden, his discussion of the book From Homer to Harry Potter, which sounds like a fascinating discussion of what myth means, especially in relation to religious faith.

From The Egotist’s Club, there is so much to make me thankful, but I remember now with fondness the gentle poem written by Melpomene’s kid sister.

From The Bookwyrm’s Lair, her examination of why she hated the death of a certain character in Harry Potter.

From With Eager Feet, this rumination on how Christ’s humility completes and perfects what was missing in Aristotelian magnanimity.

From Humane Pursuits, this rumination on the individual’s responsibilities to those in need.

From Aftran’s YA Book Reviews, this review of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Swiftly Tilting Planet which has some good insights.

From Things My Children Said, this hilarious story of a 6 year-old painstakingly writing his letter to Santa. And also these photos of Doctor Who figurines, because they’re hilarious.

From Emily at WanderLust, this rumination on Michael Phelps, humility, and the Olympics is quite good.

From Brian Melton at Passing Through the Shadowlands, this explanation of the dangers of moral debunkery.

From Ellipsis Omnibus, the review of Spurgeon’s All of Graceis also a fine reflection on the beautiful heart of Christ’s gospel of grace.

From Eric William Barnum: TragicHero, this spotlight on three creation stories by Tolkien, Lewis, and Richard Adams.

From Literary Legends Quests & Odysseys, this summary of the key ideas presented in each of The Chronicles of Narnia.

From Lantern Hollow Press, SO MUCH, but especially their very own Thanksgiving post from today! It cheerily celebrates the goodness of fellowship through feasting by way of Brian Jacques’ Redwall books.

Speaking of Brian Jacques, you can’t go wrong with the reviews of the entire Redwall series by Rose Red Prince.

From Catecinem, very many posts, but recently this piece about the reported “death” of film culture.”

From Jamie at The Tousled Apostle, her thoughts on how God can speak to us through music.

From Malcom Wilson at badonicus — a fantastic blog on the historical King Arthur which I should read far more than I actually do – I like his informative overview of the strong likelihood that an historical King Arthur was indeed Christian.

From CHILDREN OF ARTHUR, his list of legendary figures whom royals have sometimes claimed descendence from is quite interesting.

From The Fourth Person, his insightful reviews of Rosemary Sutcliff and his love for my own favorite book of hers, The Lantern Bearers.

You’ve all given so generously to me, that I do hope not only that I can give back in good kind, but that you may all benefit from each other. Happy reading, and God bless!

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Author: David

I’m a young Christian American reader writer dreamer wanderer walker flier listener talker scholar adventurer musician word-magician romantic critic religious idealist optipessimist man.

22 thoughts on “Thanksblogging”

  1. Thanks again for including me! I’m thankful to be welcome in such a company of intelligent, thoughtful writers. May the year ahead include many interesting conversations!

    1. Haha, or perhaps none of mine are distinctive enough to be recalled! +) Thanks for the compliment, though. I believe there’s a great community here, and it’d only be enhanced if all the bloggers I listed interacted with each other.

  2. Thanks for including me in this! These all look really interesting and such a wide variety. I’ll have to check some of them out!

  3. Oh dear oh dear. Look what you’ve done. Now I want to go around and read all of these and you know I don’t have time for that. You did this just to torture me, didn’t you?

    I’ve already had a little pilgrimage through Brenton’s blog and he alone has enough fascinating material to keep me occupied for hours. Garrr!

    So I must grudgingly thank you for this list – quite ungrudgingly thank you for including me in it – and thank you in general for the reviews you write here. Even though I get touchy sometimes and call you too strict, I’m inclined to think you’re right more often than I am. There’s no where else I find reviews as good as yours.

    There, that’s my two bits. : )

  4. Thank you for the mention; I’m a mutual fan of yours as well. Looks like you’ll have come reciprocal linkage coming your way from my blog this year! (Which would probably have happened anyway, but now it’s imperative!)

    Also, it’ll take me quite a while to read through all those other links. Woof.

    1. You’re welcome, of course, and thank you! For all your posts I’ve commented on, there are at least that many again that I read, was impressed by, but just couldn’t find the time or the sufficient words to comment with.

      I prefer to put the focus on other bloggers, but it’s nice when I get feedback about what exactly people like in my posts, and which posts are really worth your time. And having such an excellent community here inspires me to improve my own writing at every opportunity.

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