Podcasts – The Tolkien Professor

Following from the post on some of my favorite history podcasts, I want to let you know about some of my favorite literary podcasts. Today, it’s The Tolkien Professor!   The Tolkien Professor by Dr. Corey Olsen http://tolkienprofessor.com/ iTunes listing Episode length: expect 1 – 2 hours, depending on the series Look, if you’re a … Continue reading Podcasts – The Tolkien Professor

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“Mud” – a short story

"He saw only new wonders: rolling plains leading to a purple sea, flocks of four and six-winged birds singing above white sands, and a city of painted mollusk shells full of tiny blue people."

Constellations, spells, symbolic plants and strange objects: Questions from Jubilare

Back in June, the excellent Jubilare posted a few questions for her readers which were designed to spark creative thought about worldbuilding in fiction. They are excellent questions, but in my unfortunate and unintentional habit, I promised to answer them and then got distracted by life things and forgot. Until, quite recently, she reminded me, … Continue reading Constellations, spells, symbolic plants and strange objects: Questions from Jubilare

A new epic rises, and it’s looking for a title

I am near to quivering with excitement and glee. My dear friend and accomplished artist/writer/tree-climbing crazyperson Michelle has finally kicked her long-gestating webcomic into gear. Please hop on over to read the first page of Epic Title Here! It already has floating islands, aromatic teas, Krishna, Quetzalcoatl, and some guy who looks Sumerian, so I'm … Continue reading A new epic rises, and it’s looking for a title

In Memoriam: Roger Ebert (1942-2013)

Roger Ebert, respected film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times and arguably the most popular and influential man in the history of his profession, passed away Thursday, April 4, 2013. He was also the greatest blogger the Internet has yet seen. Since this blog would be very different if I had never read him, it seems … Continue reading In Memoriam: Roger Ebert (1942-2013)

“Morn, with the Spring in her arms…”

I submit this thesis for your reflection: The greatest possible event, in any kind of story, real or invented, is the redemption of some undeserving person through pure love and grace. Often it is at the story's end, as with the Prodigal Son, but it need not be. In Les Misérables, it happens at the … Continue reading “Morn, with the Spring in her arms…”

Treasure Our Young Folks and Nurture Their Minds

At some point last year, on the shelf at my library where they sell unwanted books cheaply, I spent $1.50 for a green leather-bound Volume One of The Young Folks Treasury published in 1919 by The University Society. It is in wonderfully good condition, with a cover as smooth as the day it was printed … Continue reading Treasure Our Young Folks and Nurture Their Minds

Chesterton On Democratic Civilization, Human Nature, and Telegraph Poles

Frequent contributor Mr. Chesterton here again, this time with a little story and rumination combination. What’s it about? Well, as my post title suggests, Democratic Civilization, Human Nature, and the titular Telegraph Poles. I've decided not to enclose the text in WordPress' "block quotes," because that narrows the margins and italicizes the text, making a … Continue reading Chesterton On Democratic Civilization, Human Nature, and Telegraph Poles

Rosemary Sutcliff Describes the Thrill of Chariot-Racing

The young Roman Centurion Marcus is allowed to try out the team of black horses belonging to Cradoc, a British tribesman and charioteer: “[Marcus] took the team through every trick and test that their master ordered, until the moment came for a final burst of speed, and they were sweeping at full gallop round the … Continue reading Rosemary Sutcliff Describes the Thrill of Chariot-Racing