Song of the Entwives, by J.R.R. Tolkien

Since finishing The Hobbit, I've been re-reading The Lord of the Rings. I finished Fellowship a month or so ago, and am now well into The Two Towers. It's a lovely, enlightening read. It's been at least a decade since I've read this book -- most of my Tolkien-reading being spent among The Silmarillion and its spinoff … Continue reading Song of the Entwives, by J.R.R. Tolkien

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Artists hearken; seek Poesy for inspiration!

Melodramatic title for this post aside, I really would love to see an artist's interpretation of this poem by Donald T. Williams. I'm finally near the end of his book of theological and fantastical poetry entitled Stars Through the Clouds, published by Lantern Hollow Press, which I will indeed review in whole, but I wanted … Continue reading Artists hearken; seek Poesy for inspiration!

“A Christmas Legend” by Frank Sidgwick

At the Dickens Fair  this year, I saw this poem performed with a brilliance that brought its every image and emotion to life. Reading the text by itself cannot, of course, deliver the same experience, but nonetheless it is a joy to read. I know nothing of this Frank Sidgwick, but his poem sounds like … Continue reading “A Christmas Legend” by Frank Sidgwick

“A Song of Aryador” by J.R.R. Tolkien

The recent dearth of posts is not what I had planned for this month, but is caused by intensive training for my new job. The review for Series 3 of Doctor Who is in the works (as it should have been long ago), and I am happily taking notes on Series 4 now. I am … Continue reading “A Song of Aryador” by J.R.R. Tolkien

Cat Noir, Cat Blue: “The Cat Piano” short film

In a city of singing cats, a lonely beat poet falls for a beautiful siren. When a mysterious dark figure emerges, kidnapping the town’s singers for his twisted musical plans, the poet must save his muse and put an end to the nefarious tune that threatens to destroy the city.

Chesterton’s “Chord of Colour”

Ah, Chesterton, witty Christian sage! Here he expounds again on his favorite subject: how the unspiritual man blinds himself to the magnificent glories of God's creation. In this poem, we appear to have a narrator utterly besotted with his Lady fair; and yet not so besotted as to worship her at the exclusion of the … Continue reading Chesterton’s “Chord of Colour”

“The Last Voyage of Eärendel” by J.R.R. Tolkien

This is the first poem written by Tolkien about the character of Eärendil, the famous voyager who in Middle-Earth mythology carried the morning star on his brow across the sky. Interestingly enough, the character's name comes from the Anglo-Saxon word Éarendel, a name associated with the star Rigel in Orion, which is a wandering star … Continue reading “The Last Voyage of Eärendel” by J.R.R. Tolkien

“Modern Elfland” by G.K. Chesterton

Our dear friend Gilbert Keith is back again! Finding various poems of his online was a treat, and this particular one spoke to me the most. In it, the narrator, a native of fairyland, returns to his home to find it overtaken by industry and modernity. It's a horrible, heartbreaking sight. The trees, I gather, … Continue reading “Modern Elfland” by G.K. Chesterton

“The Fairies” by William Allingham (1824-1889)

William Allingham was a man of letters, born in Ballyshannon, County Donegal, who was known for beautiful descriptive lyric poetry. This poem, however, reminds us that the fair folk can be quite dangerous and capricious in nature. Sixteen of his poems may be read online here. The Fairies William Allingham Up the airy mountain, Down … Continue reading “The Fairies” by William Allingham (1824-1889)