Book Review: “Swords and Deviltry” by Fritz Leiber

Swords and Deviltryby Fritz Leiber Goodreads Series: Volume 1 of the Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser series, chronologically arranged Pages: 254 Published: 1970 Spoiler-free Synopsis: Three stories to launch a series of epic adventures. “The Snow Women” introduces the young barbarian Fafhrd as he seeks to leave his oppressive and narrow-minded Snow Clan (and itsContinue reading “Book Review: “Swords and Deviltry” by Fritz Leiber”

Review: “Letters from Father Christmas” by J.R.R. Tolkien

Letters from Father Christmas by J.R.R. Tolkien Goodreads link Pages: 110 Published: first in 1976, this edition 2004 Spoiler-free Synopsis: From 1920 to 1943, the children of J.R.R. Tolkien would write letters to Father Christmas. Every year, Father Christmas answered them, often with accompanying pictures. These are those letters and pictures. Re-readability: I do believeContinue reading “Review: “Letters from Father Christmas” by J.R.R. Tolkien”

Classic Remarks: Which classic book should have a sequel?

Which classic book do you wish had a sequel, and why? In trying to brainstorm a list for this post, I was assaulted by the feeling that I have not read enough of the classics of world literature. Which classic book do I wish had a sequel? First off, which classic books have I actuallyContinue reading “Classic Remarks: Which classic book should have a sequel?”

Review: “The Old Man and the Sea” by Ernest Hemingway

I do not love this story for any themes. I do love it somewhat for the atmosphere — the lapping of the waves, the slapping of fins on water, the salt breezes, the hot sun, the patched nets and stacked harpoons. But mostly, I love this story for its characters.

My Books of 2018: The Crime of Galileo

“A great and rigid authoritarian administration with a thought police which is supposed to know all should at least keep its records straight.” De Santillana, The Crime of Galileo. 1955. Page 263 The Crime of Galileo by Giorgio De Santillana (Goodreads) In school I only learned the most basic information about Galileo: that he wasContinue reading “My Books of 2018: The Crime of Galileo”

My Books of 2018: Carpenter on Tolkien

Humphrey Carpenter met with J.R.R. Tolkien once before the Professor’s death. He made an appointment, showed up promptly, and was ushered into the man’s cluttered study, which was in a converted garage separate from the main house. It is some time before he is able to state his business, as Tolkien seemed to treat aContinue reading “My Books of 2018: Carpenter on Tolkien”

My Books of 2018: Brandon Sanderson

Steelheart, Firefight, and Calamity (The Reckoners Trilogy) by Brandon Sanderson If you’ve read Mistborn and its series, you know that Brandon Sanderson is one of the most reliable fantasy authors working today for intricately-plotted entertainment. I’ve now read six novels and a novella by this man, and every single one has been thrilling and satisfying.Continue reading “My Books of 2018: Brandon Sanderson”

My Books of 2018: Ursula K. Le Guin

According to Goodreads, I finished 120 books this year. Sadly I didn’t review very much on The Warden’s Walk, but a few of them have reviews on my Goodreads profile. The actual total is a little higher because a few books I wasn’t able to log, but still, that is quite a bit more thanContinue reading “My Books of 2018: Ursula K. Le Guin”