Stop dismissing the Tolkien biopic

My review of the J.R.R. Tolkien biopic, Tolkien, is in progress. There has been a lot of great discussion about it across various forums, and I hope I won't be too late to engage some of my readers in discussion about it here. However, I've noticed a trend of responses among some Tolkien fans that … Continue reading Stop dismissing the Tolkien biopic

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More Religious Characters, Please

More Religious Characters, Please https://nevernotreadingblog.wordpress.com/2019/05/20/more-religious-characters-please/ — Read on nevernotreadingblog.wordpress.com/2019/05/20/more-religious-characters-please/

Baymoot Approaches

I too will be at Baymoot, which promises to be a great gathering of Tolkien and Lewis fans. Let me know if you are going! There’s still one week of registration left.

Luke Shelton

As many of you already know, I have been responsible for organizing Baymoot for Signum University this year.

The event takes place at Mills College in Oakland, California on Saturday, August 18, 2018. The theme is “breaking boundaries and crossing borders.” It is a one-day literature symposium. It is $40 to attend, and a light breakfast and lunch are provided.

I am very excited about the schedule we have been able to pull together, including our plenary speaker: Corey Olsen, a.k.a The Tolkien Professor!

The Baymoot organizational team has already been an invaluable help in making sure the event runs smoothly!

I just wanted to post here that there is only one week left to register for the event, where you can meet me and the other excellent speakers and share your ideas with other Tolkien and speculative fiction fans!

For more information about the event, and to register,

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“Men must endure their going hence”: The Idea of Death in C.S. Lewis’s “Out of the Silent Planet”: Guest Post by Levi Nunnink

“Men must endure their going hence”: The Idea of Death in C.S. Lewis’s “Out of the Silent Planet”: Guest Post by Levi Nunnink http://apilgriminnarnia.com/2018/07/24/osp-levi/ — Read on apilgriminnarnia.com/2018/07/24/osp-levi/ This is a great discussion of CS Lewis' "Out of the Silent Planet" by Levi Nunnink of the Culturezoo podcast. I should probably feature their podcast here, … Continue reading “Men must endure their going hence”: The Idea of Death in C.S. Lewis’s “Out of the Silent Planet”: Guest Post by Levi Nunnink

Luke Shelton’s Tolkien Experience Project

Tolkien fans of all ages will want to participate!

A Pilgrim in Narnia

One of my fondest early memories of TheHobbit was when a storyteller came to my elementary school and recited the entire book (from memory) to my fourth grade class in installments. This was a marvelous feat. I must have read the book shortly before then, because I remember following along in my head to make sure that he remembered every single word!

I went on to read The Lord of the Rings a few years after this. I vividly remember sitting in my seventh-grade science lab with the tall, black tables that were always icy to the touch and pouring over the final chapters in Return of the King.  This would mean that I finished the trilogy about a year before the Peter Jackson adaptations came out. Mind you, I was a fairly unconnected kid, so I did not realize that the movies were upon me at the…

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Classic Remarks: Favorite Picture Book – Saint George and the Dragon

What is your favorite classic picture book? Or you can tell us about a picture book you think will or should become a classic. I have written of this once before, but one of the most magical books from my childhood was Saint George and the Dragon, retold from Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene by Margaret … Continue reading Classic Remarks: Favorite Picture Book – Saint George and the Dragon

C.S. Lewis on the Right Way to Read Classics

Love and Mercy

You probably know C.S. Lewis for his imaginative Narnia fiction or perhaps for his non-fiction works on Christianity, but many are unaware of the groundbreaking and brilliant work he did within his scholarly field. Lewis was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford and the premier professor of Medieval and Renaissance literature at Cambridge, so his knowledge of greater literature itself was deep and profound. His students and colleagues were frequently amazed by his astonishing recall of minute detail in obscure works. He would play a game with you when you came to his office where he would have you pull down any book off his shelf and read a random passage out of it. He would tell you the work, author, and quote the surrounding context. Suffice it to say, the man knew his stuff.

CS-Lewis-on-the-Reading-of-Old-BooksBeing that Lewis had his ears to the ground with his students…

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Classic Remarks: A Much-Read Childhood Classic

Which children’s classic couldn’t you read enough of when you were growing up? Several books could probably be mentioned here, especially given a loose definition of “classic,” but the ones that stand out to me are the Picture Classics graphic novels Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, adaptations of Mark Twain’s famous novels. As I flip … Continue reading Classic Remarks: A Much-Read Childhood Classic

Classic Remarks: My Favorite Jane Austen Adaptation

Which Jane Austen adaptation is your favorite and why? I am again at a disadvantage. My familiarity with Regency-era literature is so poor that my only Austen novel is Emma. I do have a general understanding of Pride and Prejudice, however, and it happens that the only Austen adaptation I have fully seen is one … Continue reading Classic Remarks: My Favorite Jane Austen Adaptation

Classic Remarks: What to read after “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings”

What Tolkien book would you recommend to a reader after they’ve read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings? There are a few possibilities for this one, depending on your tastes. But my first answer would be The Silmarillion. This is the book with all the tales of how Middle-Earth came to be. It … Continue reading Classic Remarks: What to read after “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings”