Short Film: “Cloudrise”


Yeah, I know, as a blogger I’m becoming sort of like that uncle you used to like and spend a lot of time with, but who now is never around except when he pops in randomly with a treat or something and is always promising to continue taking you on awesome adventures just like you used to in what is fast becoming “the old days.” But seriously, this short film is cool enough that you should forgive me anyway. It’s got airships, and hang-gliding pirates, and love. Why don’t more films feature these things? Is it because they’re afraid of joy?


Cloudrise from Denver Jackson on Vimeo.

“Breathtaking. One of the best short films I have ever seen.”
– Kazu Kibuishi, Author of New York Times Best-Seller Amulet

Cloudrise is a short animated film directed and animated by Denver Jackson.
It was created in the span of four months from conception to completion.

Set in a fantasy world above the clouds, Cloudrise follows a pivotal moment in the lives of two lovers as they face a great challenge. Watch as Miko and Tenku fight to survive an attack on their new airship and take the necessary measures to help each other. Hold on to your seat as you witness how far someone is willing to go to rescue the one they love. This is an action-packed short film that ties together various fantasy/science fiction influences.

 

Short Film: “Dark Noir”

A stylish, lean short film about a private eye who can see into the invisible world where peoples’ ideas are manifested literally.


There’s something cheeky about a film that is essentially titled “Dark Black.” A splash of stylish French is but a token attempt to mask the redundancy. This fantasy noir plays its story fairly straight, but there is a hint of humorous exaggeration in the animation; just enough to let me feel that the filmmakers were having some respectful fun with the genre, and not getting too full of themselves.

Going by the “disclaimer” at the beginning and the announcement that “Dark Noir” is produced by the vodka company Absolut, this might be some sort of advertisement. However, it has nothing obvious to do with vodka or any kind of alcohol, beyond one of the settings being a bar. Perhaps this is another touch of irony?

Regardless, I think it works pretty well as a short film. It takes only a lean two and a half minutes to tell a story complete with set up, interesting plot progression, a surprising twist, and a satisfying resolution. The plot as a whole is nothing brilliant or original — in fact, it’s almost by-the-numbers for the noir genre. But the fantasy premise is a neat one, and the storytellers work it in well. The animation is pretty fantastic, especially how they gave 2D animation a functional, effective place amidst all the fancy 3D graphics. I’d happily watch a feature film in this style.

Let me know what you think of “Dark Noir.”

 

Dark Noir from Gillian Glendinning on Vimeo.

Short Film: “Oktapodi” (2007)


For some reason I never thought to share this one before. It was one of the very first animated shorts that I discovered on YouTube, and it’s equally hilarious every time I watch it. My niece and nephews also get a kick out of it. There’s a madcap, slapstick brilliance to it that reminds me of both Looney Tunes and Buster Keaton. But what are words in the face of it? I can say this, however: Oktapodi features one of the most entertaining car chases I’ve seen in any film, long or short. And there’s only one car involved.

It’s also kind of a sweet love story.

Another gem from Gobelins l’école. Here is more information about the filmmakers.

Short Film: “The Girl and the Fox” (2011)


“The Girl and the Fox”

Premise: A young girl who lives in the wilderness with her family takes it upon herself to hunt a fox that has been killing their livestock.

I like short movies like this. It’s a simple, sweet concept well-drawn and animated. The characters have bold, clear designs, uncluttered by unnecessary lines, but they move through landscapes of subtle shades (that, while almost certainly digitally drawn, look like watercolors). The music is smooth and ethereal to bring out the emotions, but is grounded by the natural sounds of the forest; as the high flute and lyrical strings play, we hear birds twittering and leaves rustling. The central concept of the story is a bit romantic and not likely to happen in real life (though I have heard stories of wild animals showing uncharacteristic care for humans), but there’s a layer of reality at its foundation: the girl’s family needs their livestock in order to survive the winter, and likewise the fox needs to eat in order to avoid starvation. The success of “The Girl and the Fox,” apart from the beauty of its art and sounds, is that it acknowledges this reality while still telling a tender almost-fairy-tale.

The Girl and the Fox from Base14 on Vimeo.

Congratulations to the team who made this for the awards it has received.

The movie’s official site.

Short Film: “Metro” and an update


Firstly, I apologize for the egregious lack of updating for the past two weeks. It was not what I had expected of myself. In fact, this whole year has been pretty bad as far as planned reviews go. I’ve been very busy with life stuff, but I’ve also gotten lazy. Fortunately, my reviews of the 1985 movie Legend and Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island are nearing completion, and hopefully should pop onto the Internet before long.

(Notice the vague term “before long.”)

As a bit of a conciliatory gift, I do offer you another imaginative short film. This one—somewhat like Neverwhere—explores a sprawling, magical world beneath our city streets and among our subway and sewer systems. Unlike Gaiman’s book, there doesn’t seem to be anything particularly murderous lurking around: just a white fox who steals orange subway tickets from little girls, before dashing off through the pipe system and into a surprisingly spacious underground world. This girl, however, gives chase (she must really have been looking forward to wherever the subway was going to take her), and what she finds—that is, what  the white fox seems to want her to see—is rather unexpected, and, I think, quite nice.

METRO by Jacob WyattLike so many short fantasy films, this one is like a visual poem. There is a story, but the purpose of the film itself is more about the emotional and artistic experience of it all: of the impressionistic, light-on-details animation, of the dreamlike, but sometimes insistent, piano music, and of the suggestion of beauties in our world that we haven’t yet discovered, not because they are so far over the horizon, but because they lie quietly under our very feet.

METRO by Jacob Wyatt

METRO from Jacob Wyatt on Vimeo.

Short Film: “Super Soaker: The Thin Wet Line”


So it’s not actually a fantasy story, as per my usual requirement. But it celebrates the glorious possibilities of kids’ imagination, especially once school is out and epic battles begin to be waged beneath the summer sun. While I never had water fights quite this involved, I do remember many capture-the-flag games playing out like this in my head. I was the short, lean, fast kid, the one most people ignored so that I could walk quietly and casually down the side of the field without people noticing, until I suddenly made a mad dash for the jail and freed my side’s cheering prisoners-of-war.

Ah, the halcyon days of youth….

Super Soaker “The Thin Wet Line” from COWORKERS on Vimeo.

Short Film: “Night Light”


I promise, an actual Post of Original Content will come before too long. I’ve got the Meme to finish and a bunch of other overdue stuff as well.

But first, another pretty animated short film. I had to watch it twice to understand what was going on, because it flies by so quickly, but it’s worth watching more than that just for the beautiful colors and music. It’s got enough heart to make you smile, even if it doesn’t have the emotional punch of After the Rain or Eyrie. And the central idea is really cool, dreamlike stuff. I wish it were longer.

Night Light from Qing Han on Vimeo.