Library Booksale Raid #2


First things first: I have a warm welcome to offer Autumn on this midnight of its equinox (or rather, the midnight after its equinox)…except that Autumn hasn’t yet shown up where I am. In fact, the last couple of days have felt like blazing midsummer. Which irks me, as Autumn is my favorite of the seasons. The cool breezes bearing faint burnt scents, the sharp slate skies, the foliage of amber, flame, and emerald mixed together. I drink it in, even though our Autumn isn’t as lush as those elsewhere.

But it hasn’t shown up yet, so I can’t welcome it. Fiddlesticks.

Fiddlesticks.

“But surely,” criest thou, “that canst be the reason for this post, which beareth the noble title of library book sale?”

“Of course it canst,” repliest I, “and callest me not Shirley.”

(Credit where credit is due.)

Despite the distinct lack of Autumn, this day was not a waste. I only worked a half day, and in the evening I went to one of my local library’s triannual book sales, that I so love. And here, dear friends, is my loot, bought for a mere $4.50.

YES, I already own a copy and have reviewed it here. But three times a year, every year, I go to these book sales combing the tables for a Sutcliff novel, and this is the first time I have FINALLY found one. It’s the exact same edition as the one I already own. It’s in perfect condition, which is kind of sad because it means virtually no one has read it. But now I have an extra to give away! That makes me happy.

I bought The Sable Quean mostly out of nostalgia for Brian Jacques, but also because this is one of his later novels which I haven’t read. The plot sounds standard Redwall, but it should be comfortable slipping back into Jacques’ charming world. It’ll probably get a review once I read it, eventually.

What can I say? I’m a medievalist with an interest in philosophy, so this was nearly irresistible. As the title suggests, it traces the influences and development of medieval philosophies and thought from the ancient Greeks and the Bible on through the Romans, the early church fathers, Arab thinkers, etcetera. When I’ll have the time to read this, I don’t know — I’ve got many other similar titles lying around, giving me great pleasure to look at but losing places on my reading list to more and more fantasy.

Ta-da! The cream of the crop. I’ve been hearing about Peter S. Beagle’s The Last Unicorn for longer than I can remember. Both the book and the animated movie have been called classics of fantasy, and I’ve never had the chance to see for myself. Well, that will change. I’ve got a copy in my book stacks, and at some point in the maybe-kind-of-not-so-distant future, I will read it, and probably review it. +)

On other news fronts: the Series 3 Doctor Who review is STILL coming, yes it is; just be patient. I’ve been super busy lately.

Also, the Highlander Audio reviews should be coming very soon as well. I feel very guilty for neglecting those, as I was given review copies by one of the writers, and the polite thing would have been to review them earlier this summer. But they are not forgotten! I will review them ASAP.

And lastly, I am about halfway through Stephen Lawhead’s Merlin, the sequel to Taliesin, and loving it. So far, the book has showcased more of Lawhead’s strengths as a writer than Taliesin did, and has kept the melodrama to a minimum (although some still creeps in now and then).

So, have you folks made any interesting book purchases lately?

Book Review: “The Eagle of the Ninth” by Rosemary Sutcliff


Title: The Eagle of the Ninth
Author: Rosemary Sutcliff
Series: No, though it forms a thematic trilogy with The Silver Branch and The Lantern Bearers.
Published: 1954
Pages: 255
Spoiler-free Synopsis: Around A.D. 117, the Ninth Legion marched north of Agricola’s Wall to deal with an uprising of Scottish tribesmen and was never seen again. Years later, the commander’s son, Marcus Aquila, decides to venture north to find the lost Eagle standard of his father, taking with him only Esca, the former British slave who has become his friend. The Eagle means Rome, honor, and good faith kept – but in the hands of Rome’s enemies, it could become a powerful weapon.
Reason for Rereading: The release of the film adaptation The Eagle prompted me to return to the book, some of which I’d forgot.
Reason for Finishing: It’s simply a really good story, exceptionally well told.
Story Re-readability: There are reasons this is considered a legitimate classic of both young adult literature and historical fiction in general; reasons I hope to expound below. This was my third read, and I can’t wait until I have a good excuse to return to it again.
Author Re-readability: Sutcliff is one of the very few authors whose books I will buy just on her name alone, as long as I have enough money available and it’s a book I don’t own. Her prose style is so consistently graceful, warm, and personal, that rereading her books feels like reminiscing about shared halcyon days with a fond old friend, and reading a new book by her feels like catching up on the life of a good friend whom you haven’t seen in a long time.
Recommended For: Surely everyone could get something from Sutcliff’s writing, but those who might especially appreciate The Eagle of the Ninth are: history buffs, particularly of Roman and “Dark Age” history, those who love adventure stories, and writers (because anyone who loves words and the good use of words should appreciate Sutcliff’s work)

More information on this title: HistoricalNovels.info Continue reading “Book Review: “The Eagle of the Ninth” by Rosemary Sutcliff”

Movie Review: “The Eagle” (2011)

The Eagle should appeal to movie-lovers who are frustrated with the way modern action movies prefer to ignore story and character in favor of rushing from bloody killing to bloody killing. It’s an exciting adventure that really does care about the characters and their relationship.


Title: The Eagle (2011) IMDb
Director: Kevin Macdonald
Lead Actors: Channing Tatum (Marcus), Jamie Bell (Esca), Tahar Rahim (Seal Prince), Donald Sutherland (Uncle Aquila), Mark Strong (Guern)
Score Composer: Atli Örvarsson
Length: 114 minutes
MPAA Rating: PG-13 for battle sequences and some disturbing images.
Spoiler-free Synopsis: “In 140 AD, twenty years after the unexplained disappearance of the entire Ninth Legion in the mountains of Scotland, young centurion Marcus Aquila arrives from Rome to solve the mystery and restore the reputation of his father, the commander of the Ninth. Accompanied only by his British slave Esca, Marcus sets out across Hadrian’s Wall into the uncharted highlands of Caledonia – to confront its savage tribes, make peace with his father’s memory, and retrieve the lost legion’s golden emblem, the Eagle of the Ninth.” (by Focus Features)
Reason for Beginning: As it’s based on the novel The Eagle of the Ninth by Rosemary Sutcliff, one of my favorite authors, I desperately wanted to see this. Been waiting for it for years.
Reason for Finishing: Somewhat classic-style adventure story, and good entertainment.
Movie Re-watchability: Yes, though I would let a little time go by first. Because the story is so simple and focused, I predict it will become the kind of movie I can easily jump into at any point, and enjoy equally in individual chunks or as a whole. It’s nice to have some movies like that.
Director Re-watchability: Hard to say, really. It’s the source material and art direction that make me like The Eagle so much, although Macdonald’s overall directing is good. He’s clearly talented, but I’m wary about his camera work: shaky cam and I do not get along. Wouldn’t know what to expect from another movie of his.
Recommendation: Not a perfect movie, but very good and rather unique. For those who like movies about ancient Rome and period adventure stories, yes. Also, if you saw Gladiator (2000) and thought “Well that’s fun, but I wonder what it all really looked like,” then you should see this movie. The Eagle should appeal to movie-lovers who are frustrated with the way modern action movies prefer to ignore story and character in favor of rushing from bloody killing to bloody killing. It’s an exciting adventure that really does care about the characters and their relationship. Continue reading “Movie Review: “The Eagle” (2011)”

Rosemary Sutcliff Describes the Thrill of Chariot-Racing


The young Roman Centurion Marcus is allowed to try out the team of black horses belonging to Cradoc, a British tribesman and charioteer:

Illustration from the hardback second edition of "The Eagle of the Ninth."

“[Marcus] took the team through every trick and test that their master ordered, until the moment came for a final burst of speed, and they were sweeping at full gallop round the mile-wide curve of the woodshore.

To Marcus that moment was always like being born from one kind of life into another. So must an arrow feel when it leaves the bow! It had been hot and sultry in the old life, but in this one the cool wind flowed against him like water, pressing his thin scarlet tunic into his body, singing past his ears above the soft thunder of the ponies’ flying hooves. He crouched lower, feeling the chariot floor buoyant and vibrating under his wide-set feet, feeling the reins quick with life in his hands, his will flowing out along them to the flying team, and their response flowing back to him, so that they were one. He called to them in the Celtic tongue, urging them on.

‘On, brave hearts! On, bold and beautiful! Thy mares shall be proud of thee, the tribe shall sing thy praises to their children’s children! Sweff! Sweff, my brothers!’

For the first time he loosed the lash, letting it fly out and flicker like dark lightning above their ears without ever touching them. The forest verge spun by, the fern streaked away beneath flying hooves and whirling wheels. He and his team were a comet shooting down the bright ways of the sky; a falcon stooping against the sun…”

Rosemary Sutcliff, The Eagle of the Ninth, pg. 19-20

What’s coming up (2-16-2011)


Reviews I am currently writing:

Books

Taliesin by Stephen R. Lawhead

Movies


The Eagle (2011) (IMDb)

TV Shows
Doctor Who Series 1 (2005)

Webcomics

Lackadaisy Cats (found here)

Also, I have started rereading The Dragonheroes by Blake Garrett Anderson and The Eagle of the Ninth by Rosemary Sutcliff (on which The Eagle movie is based) for proper review.