Baymoot Approaches

I too will be at Baymoot, which promises to be a great gathering of Tolkien and Lewis fans. Let me know if you are going! There’s still one week of registration left.

Luke Shelton

As many of you already know, I have been responsible for organizing Baymoot for Signum University this year.

The event takes place at Mills College in Oakland, California on Saturday, August 18, 2018. The theme is “breaking boundaries and crossing borders.” It is a one-day literature symposium. It is $40 to attend, and a light breakfast and lunch are provided.

I am very excited about the schedule we have been able to pull together, including our plenary speaker: Corey Olsen, a.k.a The Tolkien Professor!

The Baymoot organizational team has already been an invaluable help in making sure the event runs smoothly!

I just wanted to post here that there is only one week left to register for the event, where you can meet me and the other excellent speakers and share your ideas with other Tolkien and speculative fiction fans!

For more information about the event, and to register,

View original post 8 more words

Advertisements

“Men must endure their going hence”: The Idea of Death in C.S. Lewis’s “Out of the Silent Planet”: Guest Post by Levi Nunnink

“Men must endure their going hence”: The Idea of Death in C.S. Lewis’s “Out of the Silent Planet”: Guest Post by Levi Nunnink

“Men must endure their going hence”: The Idea of Death in C.S. Lewis’s “Out of the Silent Planet”: Guest Post by Levi Nunnink
— Read on apilgriminnarnia.com/2018/07/24/osp-levi/

This is a great discussion of CS Lewis’ “Out of the Silent Planet” by Levi Nunnink of the Culturezoo podcast. I should probably feature their podcast here, as I’ve been enjoying it for some time. But for now, I turn you to this guest post and encourage you to seek out Culturezoo for yourself!

Luke Shelton’s Tolkien Experience Project

Tolkien fans of all ages will want to participate!

A Pilgrim in Narnia

One of my fondest early memories of TheHobbit was when a storyteller came to my elementary school and recited the entire book (from memory) to my fourth grade class in installments. This was a marvelous feat. I must have read the book shortly before then, because I remember following along in my head to make sure that he remembered every single word!

I went on to read The Lord of the Rings a few years after this. I vividly remember sitting in my seventh-grade science lab with the tall, black tables that were always icy to the touch and pouring over the final chapters in Return of the King.  This would mean that I finished the trilogy about a year before the Peter Jackson adaptations came out. Mind you, I was a fairly unconnected kid, so I did not realize that the movies were upon me at the…

View original post 1,500 more words

Classic Remarks: Favorite Picture Book – Saint George and the Dragon

What is your favorite classic picture book? Or you can tell us about a picture book you think will or should become a classic.

I have written of this once before, but one of the most magical books from my childhood was Saint George and the Dragon, retold from Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene by Margaret Hodges, and illustrated by Trina Schart Hyman.

Please permit me the indulgence of quoting from my old post on the subject (linked above), as that post was answering essentially the same question as this.


This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This is the knightly quest told in its purest form…

…the true attraction is really the art by Trina Schart Hyman…The weather is present in her images, whether wind or blue sky, clouds or boiling dragon-smoke. Her Fair Folk are wispy, like they might blow away at any moment, her Red Cross Knight (George) exudes strength and pure-heartedness, and her Princess Una is a vision of loveliness, quiet strength, and deep feeling.

…The battle of the dragon and knight is exciting and well-paced. You really feel the energy that both of them exert, and when after the first day of fighting the Red Cross Knight falls exhausted and wounded to sleep by “an ancient spring of silvery water,” and Una comes up to cover him with a cloak, in the picture you can hear the brook bubbling and the crickets singing as cool nighttime descends.

…It’s a fairy tale given the breath of life.


Classic Remarks: Should “Lolita” be assigned in schools?

Should we be assigning Lolita in schools or is it taking up valuable syllabus space another book should have?

This is another case where I have not read the subject book, Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita. I have never been required to read it, nor have I desired to. However, I am familiar with it in summary and reputation. Based on this, I would most definitely keep it out of school syllabi, except possibly for a college course in which the novel’s subject matter of pedophilia and psychiatry would be deemed relevant. I would be interested to hear from someone who has read or studied the book.

The story follows a man calling himself Humbert Humbert who obsessively lusts after young girls, especially a flirtatious and manipulative 12 year-old called Lolita with whom he has a perverse and torrid affair for several years. Humbert narrates his ugly, evil actions in beautiful, sophisticated prose designed to win the reader’s sympathy. There’s a deliberate contrast between the way he writes and the way he acts. Yet even though he labors to prove he is not insane and to justify his life and actions, his story still ends in violence and loneliness.

As I understand it, Nabokov fully intends for us to despise Humbert and his sins. He also seems to scorn psychiatrists (especially those in the Freudian tradition) who seek simplistic ways to understand human behavior. One may do terrible, despicable things and yet still be a complex human being. Likewise, one may be a complex human being and yet still be justly condemned for choosing to do (and to enjoy) terrible, despicable things.

Do students, even up to the high school level, need to explore the crime of pedophilia in detail? And from the viewpoint of a charismatic predator? I don’t think so. Warn kids against strangers and teach them how to stay safe, by all means! But I see no reason why high school students (or younger) should be required to read a book that dramatizes such a traumatizing perversion from the viewpoint of the predator. From what I can tell, any important lesson in the book could also be gained from other powerful books that don’t dramatize pedophilia so graphically.

Looking at my own high school self, I guess that if I had read Lolita then, I would have been disgusted and disturbed, with those affects lasting, and would not have received much of any redeeming value in return. As opposed to something like Night by Elie Wiesel, which was disturbing in a way that was important and eye-opening. Night causes the reader to challenge prejudice and oppression by forcing us to confront the humanity of the victims and the injustice they have suffered, whereas Lolita gives us only the viewpoint of an unrepentant sexual predator.

Movie Review: “The Secret of Roan Inish” (1993)

“The Secret of Roan Inish” is both magical and comfortably down-to-earth in all its elements.

The Secret of Roan Inish (1993) (IMdB)
Director: John Sayles
Writers: John Sayles (screenplay) and Rosalie Fry (book)
Starring: Jeni Courtney, Mick Lally, Eileen Colgan, Richard Sheridan, John Lynch
Music by: Mason Daring
Length: 89 minutes
Rating (US): PG
Spoiler-free Synopsis: Young Fiona lives with her grandparents in a small fishing village on the Irish west coast and begins unraveling family mysteries while searching for her lost baby brother.
Reason for Watching: Selkie movie. Perfect movie.
Movie Re-watchability: Eminently, for me. It’s been a favorite film for many years and has never failed to inspire or move me.
Director Re-watchability: I haven’t seen Sayles’ other films, but have heard that each one is completely different. That speaks to a tremendous range in his abilities as a storyteller, but also makes it hard to determine whether I’d like his other ones. His style in this film, however, is one that suits me perfectly.
Recommendation: YES.

Key Thoughts

Continue reading “Movie Review: “The Secret of Roan Inish” (1993)”